Sunday, May 23, 2010

Shazbot!

This is really turning out to be one of those days where I find myself stymied at every possible turn by the Fates. Now, I know this is all going to sound a bit pissy…but just hear me out.

Originally, Turner Classic Movies was planning to show the 1944 mystery-comedy Nine Girls tomorrow as part of an Evelyn Keyes film festival. But they’ve yanked the movie from the lineup; why I don’t entirely know but I’m leaving a note for Michael Schlesinger over at Facebook and asking him if it’s possible that Sony didn’t have a broadcast print at the ready (he’s currently hobnobbing at Cinevent, so it may be a while before he gets back to me). (Update: Just heard back from Mr. Schlesinger, who posited: "That would be my guess.") This is a major bummer—I was so looking forward to seeing this one again. Anyway, here’s the old schedule:

7:00 AM Before I Hang (1940)

A mad scientist experiments with a serum tainted with a psychopath's blood. Cast: Boris Karloff, Evelyn Keyes, Bruce Bennett. Dir: Nick Grinde. BW-62 mins, TV-PG, CC

8:15 AM Face Behind the Mask, The (1941)

When a fire leaves him hideously scarred, an immigrant turns to crime. Cast: Peter Lorre, Evelyn Keyes, George E. Stone. Dir: Robert Florey. BW-68 mins,

9:30 AM Flight Lieutenant (1942)

A disgraced pilot sets out to regain his son's respect. Cast: Pat O'Brien, Glenn Ford, Evelyn Keyes. Dir: Sidney Salkow. BW-80 mins, TV-PG

11:00 AM Dangerous Blondes (1943)

A mystery writer and his wife investigate the murder of a couturier's wife. Cast: Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes, Edmund Lowe. Dir: Leigh Jason. BW-81 mins,

12:30 PM Nine Girls (1944)

When a sorority girl is found murdered, her classmates set out to solve the case. Cast: Ann Harding, Evelyn Keyes, Anita Louise. Dir: Leigh Jason. BW-78 mins, TV-PG

2:00 PM Strange Affair (1944)

A mystery writer and his wife investigate a murder at a charity benefit. Cast: Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes, Edgar Buchanan. Dir: Alfred E. Green. BW-78 mins,

3:30 PM There's Something About a Soldier (1943)

Five officer candidates fight to prove their mettle during training. Cast: Tom Neal, Evelyn Keyes, Bruce Bennett. Dir: Alfred E. Green. BW-81 mins,

5:00 PM Renegades (1946)

A prominent citizen's daughter marries an outlaw's son. Cast: Evelyn Keyes, Willard Parker, Larry Parks. Dir: George Sherman. C-87 mins,

6:30 PM Johnny O'Clock (1947)

Gambling hall owners get mixed up with a cop on the take, leading to murder and mystery. Cast: Dick Powell, Evelyn Keyes, Lee J. Cobb. Dir: Robert Rossen. BW-96 mins,

And the new one:

8:00 AM Face Behind the Mask, The (1941)

When a fire leaves him hideously scarred, an immigrant turns to crime. Cast: Peter Lorre, Evelyn Keyes, George E. Stone. Dir: Robert Florey. BW-68 mins, TV-PG

9:15 AM Flight Lieutenant (1942)

A disgraced pilot sets out to regain his son's respect. Cast: Pat O'Brien, Glenn Ford, Evelyn Keyes. Dir: Sidney Salkow. BW-80 mins, TV-PG

10:45 AM Dangerous Blondes (1943)

A mystery writer and his wife investigate the murder of a couturier's wife. Cast: Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes, Edmund Lowe. Dir: Leigh Jason. BW-81 mins, TV-G

12:15 PM Meet Me on Broadway (1946)

When his career crashes and burns, a director tries to come back staging country club shows. Cast: Marjorie Reynolds, Jinx Falkenberg, Spring Byington. Dir: Leigh Jason. BW-78 mins,

1:45 PM Strange Affair (1944)

A mystery writer and his wife investigate a murder at a charity benefit. Cast: Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes, Edgar Buchanan. Dir: Alfred E. Green. BW-79 mins, TV-PG

3:15 PM There's Something About a Soldier (1943)

Five officer candidates fight to prove their mettle during training. Cast: Tom Neal, Evelyn Keyes, Bruce Bennett. Dir: Alfred E. Green. BW-81 mins, TV-G

4:45 PM Renegades (1946)

A prominent citizen's daughter marries an outlaw's son. Cast: Evelyn Keyes, Willard Parker, Larry Parks. Dir: George Sherman. C-88 mins, TV-G

6:15 PM Johnny O'Clock (1947)

Gambling hall owners get mixed up with a cop on the take, leading to murder and mystery. Cast: Dick Powell, Evelyn Keyes, Lee J. Cobb. Dir: Robert Rossen. BW-96 mins, TV-PG

Before I Hang (1940) also got the heave-ho—but that’s no biggie because I watched that one during last year’s Boris Karloff Blogathon. In Nine Girls’ place TCM will run Meet Me on Broadway (1946)—but since Keyes isn’t even in that one it kind of throws the festival off-kilter. (They should have went with A Thousand and One Nights [1945]—I wouldn’t have minded.)

I should have realized things were going to go sour when I was in Publix today and saw some Chinese food in the frozen section…and that one of the entrees was chicken fried rice. Upon closer examination, not only do I discover that it has peas and carrots…but it’s got corn in it, too! Note: My sister-in-law remains baffled as to why I have a vendetta against chicken fried rice that contains the aforementioned vegetables; she states that every time she’s ordered the dish the peas and carrots have been in there. And this is not a Southern thing—she hails from the Northwest. But I remain undaunted—and as long as there’s at least one other person out there who knows that it’s a sacrilege to prepare chicken fried rice in that fashion I’ll know I’m not insane. (Now I’ll just sit around and watch the comments section fill up…)

On a sad note, Mark Evanier reports that cartoonist/animator Howard “Howie” Post has passed on at the age of 83. He worked for a number of comic book companies (according to Mark, “…no one has ever pinned down exactly when he got into comics, his work was turning up in books from most of the major New York publishers by 1945”) including DC (where he drew the comic book adventures of Bob Hope, Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis and—again from Mr. E—“Jerry Lewis without Dean Martin”) and Marvel…but is best remembered for his long stay at Harvey Comics, plotting the futures of Spooky, Hot Stuff and other funny book greats. (Post also became head of the Famous [Paramount] Studios from 1964 to 1965, replacing Seymour Kneitel in that—if you’ll pardon the pun—post.)

Admittedly, I’m not an expert on comic book artists and so I probably read acres of Post’s stuff (I was a huge Harvey fan) without realizing who was responsible…but when I saw Mark’s obit I couldn’t help but wonder why Howie’s name was so familiar. It wasn’t until I got to almost the conclusion of his post when I realized that Post was the creator of the comic strip The Dropouts (which he drew from 1968 to 1982). It’s a strip that I would read in other papers (the Charleston Gazette didn’t carry it) but I mainly remember it as being one of the animated segments on Filmation’s Archie’s TV Funnies which was a Saturday morning staple from 1971-73 in my youth.

R.I.P, Howie. You shall be missed.

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6 comments:

B said...

I've NEVER had chicken or shrimp fried rice that had peas, carrots, or corn. That's just wrong.

Ivan G. Shreve, Jr. said...

I've NEVER had chicken or shrimp fried rice that had peas, carrots, or corn. That's just wrong.

B...I can't even begin to tell you how happy I am to hear that...thank you, my friend.

Laura said...

I was so bummed that NINE GIRLS couldn't be shown!

I think that BEFORE I HANG might have been pulled as there was a time problem in the schedule; I noticed that the running time allowed for one of the versions of LES MISERABLES was originally just one hour. Oops! Ah well, I'm still excited about STRANGE AFFAIR (loved Keyes teamed with Joslyn in DANGEROUS BLONDES) and JOHNNY O'CLOCK...

Best wishes,
Laura

hobbyfan said...

Ivan,

Howie Post's Dropouts were barely used on Archie's TV Funnies. I can't say for sure how many episodes they appeared on. I watched mostly for Dick Tracy, don'tcha know. Post also created his own character for DC, a stone age hero named Anthro, who had a brief run in the late 60's.

TCM isn't the only channel that makes late changes, but it would help if they'd at least acknowledge it a day or three in advance of the scheduled broadcast day.......

Ivan G. Shreve, Jr. said...

Howie Post's Dropouts were barely used on Archie's TV Funnies. I can't say for sure how many episodes they appeared on.

Neither can I, but I still think it's odd that that's how I remember the strip--the same with Smokey Stover, I saw it on Funnies long before finding it in the newspaper (again, probably an out-of-town periodical).

I'm not sure when TCM announced the change in the schedule--it's possible it may have been much sooner than when I discovered it (I just happened to notice it when I was setting up my DVD recorder to record The Big Parade.)

Linda said...

CORN???? They put CORN in it, too??? That's not only wrong, it's disgusting. Corn belongs on a cob, lightly smeared with butter...in fried rice...no...[steps back making a cross with her fingers to protect herself from such an abomination].