Tuesday, January 4, 2011

But that’s not all, folks…

Sorry about the recent inactivity on the blog, good people.  Originally, I had planned to have this post ready towards the end of 2010—but I was having such a good time with the Christmas festivities at both Rancho Yesteryear and the ‘rents that my efforts to get it finished in time proved futile.  (And my parents, Wilder love ‘em, are still not wired for the information super highway.)

My fellow blogging compadre Stacia at She Blogged by Night was kind enough to locate the TCM obituary montage that the channel does every year—there was an interesting give-and-take in the comments section of this post about which of the montages in years past was the best; they kind of all run together for me—and the second thought that usually comes to mind after watching these things is “When did (enter celebrity name) die?”  (The first thought is always “That is one classy montage.”  I particularly liked the Peter Graves-Barbara Billingsley-Leslie Nielsen Airplane! “hat trick” in 2010’s memoriam.)  This year, it was Corey Haim (who died March 10 last year at the age of 38 from an apparent drug overdose)—I seem to recall that was around the time I was a guest at Athens Regional Medical Center, so that would probably explain why I didn’t hear about it.

In compiling a necrology for Radio Spirits for 2010, I discovered that there were quite a few passings that snuck under the TDOY radar—probably the most glaring example of this (for a longtime country music devotee like myself) was “Mister Country” hizzownself, legendary country music singer Carl Smith.  Smith, the one-time husband of both June Carter (their daughter is country-rocker Carlene Carter) and Goldie Hill, was one of the most popular country stars in the 1950s, scoring a career high of 32 Top Ten hits—five of which went to the top spot: Let Old Mother Nature Have Her Way, (When You Feel Like You’re in Love) Don’t Just Stand There, Are You Teasing Me, Hey Joe and Loose Talk.  Smith, like many of his country music contemporaries, dabbled occasionally in acting—he appeared in the films The Badge of Marshal Brennan (an oater that also features Marty Robbins…and OTR god Lawrence Dobkin) and Buffalo Gun (also with Robbins and Webb Pierce) and also appeared in a Hawaii Five-O episode, “Man on Fire” (10/21/76).  Smith died on January 16 at the age of 82.

Two female vocalists from the world of country music also passed away this year; the first being Shirley (Collie) Nelson, a country music-rockabilly artist who was also the second wife of superstar Willie Nelson.  Nelson had a couple of records reach the Top 25 of the country charts in 1961, but her biggest hit was a duet she recorded with Willie that grazed the Top Ten the following year, Willingly.  I’m not certain how accurate the Wikipedia entry is on Shirl but it mentions that she was offered the role of Pearl Bodine on The Beverly Hillbillies (the obituary here says she was hired to play “Aunt Bea,” which further muddies the matter) and the skeptic in me finds that a bit hard to believe, particularly since I was under the impression that Hillbillies creator gave the part to his old Burns and Allen pal Bea Benaderet when he didn’t let her play Granny.  In any event, Nelson played her last concert January 27 at the age of 78.

The other female country star who’s no longer with us is Judy Lynn, who had a brief bit of chart success in 1962 with the Top Ten hit Footsteps of a Fool.  A former beauty queen (Miss Idaho) whose career aspirations to be a singer landed her in a nationwide tour of Grand Ole Opry performers (she filled in for Jean Shepard), Lynn only had a few other follow-up hits (including a Top 20, My Father’s Voice) and in 1980 she quit the business to become a Christian minister.  Lynn passed away on May 26 at her Jefferson, IN home at the age of 74.

What follows is a list of actors and actresses, singers, directors, producers and other individuals who have had some measure of influence in the TDOY universe that said their last goodbyes in 2010 and that I overlooked…not intentionally, you understand.  Every one of them was talented in their own unique way, and to them we say requiescat en pace.

Gary Brockette (January 1, 62) – Motion picture and television actor/assistant director; best known role was that of Bobby Sheen in The Last Picture Show

Willie Mitchell (January 5, 81) – R&B/soul record producer and arranger whose Hi Records label featured a good number of Memphis soul music artists, notably Al Green

Beverly Aadland (January 5, 67) – Motion picture and television actress whose show business resume was a bit skimpy but is best known as Errol Flynn’s girlfriend at the time of his death (she appeared with him in 1959’s Cuban Rebel Girls)

David Giles (January 6, 83) – British television director who helmed episodes of such series as The Mayor of Casterbridge, The Darling Buds of May and Hetty Wainthropp Investigates

Donald Goerke (January 10, 83) – Franco-American food executive who invented Spaghetti-O’s

Jayne Walton Rosen (January 10, 92) – Actress-singer who was Lawrence Welk’s “Champagne Lady” from 1940-45

Ann Prentiss (January 12, 70) – Motion picture and television actress best known for playing Sgt. Candy Kane, the girlfriend of Carter Nash (William Daniels) in the TV sitcom Captain Nice

Bobby Charles (January 14, 71) – Singer-songwriter who wrote such hits as See You Later, Alligator, Walking to New Orleans and (I Don’t Know Why) But I Do

Mark Jones (January 14, 70) – British motion picture and television character actor best known for his roles in the TV series Germinal, A Family at War and Buccaneer

Chilton Price (January 14, 96) – Pop and country music songwriter who penned both Slow Poke and You Belong to Me

Glen Bell (January 16, 86) – Founder of Taco Bell

Frances Buss Buch (January 19, 92) – Television’s first female director, worked on Mike Wallace and Buff Cobb’s talk show before retiring in 1954

James Mitchell (January 22, 89) – Television actor (and dancer) best known as Palmer Cortlandt on TV’s All My Children

Johnny Seven (January 22, 83) – Motion picture and television actor best known as Lt. Carl Reese on TV’s Ironside and Shirley MacLaine’s bro-in-law in The Apartment

Barry E. Blitzer (January 27, 80) – Television comedy writer who won an Emmy as part of the team of scribes who wrote The Phil Silvers Show; also penned a number of scripts for animated cartoon series such as The Flintstones, Top Cat and The Jetsons

Betty Lou Keim (January 27, 71) – Motion picture and television actress best known as Peggy Allison on My Son Jeep and Fran McCord, sister of The Deputy; she was also married to character actor Warren Berlinger

Helen Choate (January 28, 92) – Radio actress who at one time played Patsy Bowen, girlfriend/gal Friday of Nick Carter, Master Detective

Eric Freiwald (January 29, 82) – Television writer who scripted episodes of the TV soap The Young and the Restless; with partner Robert Schafer he penned installments of such shows as Maverick, 77 Sunset Strip, Zorro and many others

Aleen Leslie (February 2, 101) – Screenwriter, playwright and novelist whose cinematic contributions include three of the films in Paramount’s Henry Aldrich series…but she’s best known to OTR fans as the creator of A Date with Judy

William Tenn (Phil Klass) (February 7, 89) – British-born science fiction author and novelist whose works were occasionally adapted for such series as Dimension X (“Child’s Play”) and X-Minus One (“Venus is a Man’s World”)

David Froman (February 8, 71) – Motion picture and television actor best known as Lt. Bob Brooks on TV’s Matlock and manservant Gunther Wagner (and his evil twin Bruno) on the soap The Edge of Night

Robert F. “Bobby” Hoy (February 8, 82) – Motion picture and television actor-stuntman best known as Joe Butler on TV’s The High Chapparal

George Waring (February 15, 84) – British motion picture and television actor best known as bigamist husband Arnold Swain on the soap opera Coronation Street

John Davis Chandler (February 16, 73) – Motion picture and television character actor (and Hinton, WV native) whose films include Mad Dog Coll, The Young Savages, Ride the High Country, Major Dundee and Those Calloways

Ronald Howes (February 16, 83) – Inventor of the Easy-Bake Oven

Rudy Larriva (February 19, 94) – Animation director responsible for those godawful Road Runner cartoons cranked out at Warner Brothers during their last days as an animation studio—but he also did the opening titles for the first season of The Twilight Zone, so he might just do a short stretch in Purgatory

Sandy Kenyon (February 20, 87) – Motion picture and television character actor and voice artist best known for his roles on the TV series Crunch and Des, The Travels of Jamie McPheeters and Knots Landing

Robin Davies (February 22, 56) – British motion picture and television moppet actor best remembered here at TDOY as Simon Harrison (and later Redway) on the Britcoms …And Mother Makes Three and …And Mother Makes Five

Steffi Sidney (February 22, 74) – Motion picture actress (and daughter of columnist-producer Sidney Skolsky) whose films include Rebel Without a Cause and Hold Back Tomorrow; later became a publicist and producer

Andrew Koenig (February 25, 41) – Television actor-director-editor (and son of Star Trek’s Walter Koenig) best remembered as Richard “Boner” Stabone on the sitcom Growing Pains (his body was found on the death date, actual date is unconfirmed)

Richard Devon (February 26, 84) – Motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include The Undead (as Satan), War of the Satellites, Machine Gun Kelly, The Three Stooges Go Around the World in a Daze and TV’s Yancy Derringer

Roger Newman (March 4, 69) – British-born television actor who had roles on the soap operas Guiding Light (as Ken Norris) and The Edge of Night; also had roles in the films Marlowe and Too Late the Hero

Ron Banks (March 4, 58) – R&B/soul vocalist who performed in the music trio The Dramatics (Whatcha See is What You Get, In the Rain)

Nan Martin (March 4, 82) – Motion picture and television character actress best known for her appearance in such films as Goodbye, Columbus and A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors; also played department store magnate Mrs. Louder on TV’s The Drew Carey Show

Richard Wyler (aka Richard Stapley) (March 5, 86) – British-born motion picture and television character actor whose films include The Three Musketeers, Little Women, Jungle Man-Eaters and D-Day, the Sixth of June; also starred in the TV series The Man from Interpol

Charles B. Pierce (March 5, 71) – Cult film director who helmed The Legend of Boggy Creek and The Town That Dreaded Sundown

Carol Marsh (March 6, 83) – British motion picture and television actress whose films include Brighton Rock, A Christmas Carol and Horror of Dracula

Tony Imi (March 8, 72) – British motion picture and television cinematographer whose credits include The Likely Lads (the movie version), The Slipper and the Rose, International Velvet and The Sea Wolves

Evelyn Dall (March 10, 92) – American-born actress and singer who was prominently featured in a number of U.K. films in the 1930s and 1940s, notably King Arthur Was a Gentleman and Time Flies

Dorothy Janis (March 10, 98) – Motion picture actress whose films include Kit Carson, The Pagan and Lummox

Paul Dunlap (March 11, 90) – Motion picture composer whose fame rests with scoring several of the 1960s Three Stooges feature films including The Three Stooges Meet Hercules and The Outlaws is Coming!

Jerry Adler (March 13, 91) – Younger brother of harmonica virtuoso Larry (Jerry also played harmonica) who served a stint with Paul Whiteman’s orchestra before contributing to such motion picture soundtracks as High Noon and Shane

Cherie DeCastro (March 14, 87) – Singer who with siblings Peggy and Babette formed the trio The DeCastro Sisters and scored a million-selling smash in 1954 with Teach Me Tonight

Lisle Wilson (March 14, 66) – Motion picture and television character actor best known for playing Leonard Taylor on the 1970s sitcom That’s My Mama; also had roles in such films as Sisters and The Incredible Melting Man

David J. Steinberg (March 15, 45) – Motion picture and television character actor best known as Meegosh in the 1988 film Willow

Herb Cohen (March 16, 77) – Record company executive and personal manager whose clientele at one time included the likes of Frank Zappa, Tom Waits, Linda Ronstadt and Lenny Bruce

Alex Chilton (March 17, 59) – Rock ‘n’ roll vocalist and musician who fronted the blue-eyed soul group The Box Tops (The Letter, Cry Like a Baby) before moving on to even greater critical acclaim as the lead singer for Big Star

Bill McIntyre (March 19, 80) – Motion picture and television character actor who appeared on such series as Dallas, Newhart and Murphy Brown

Claiborne Cary (March 20, 78) – Actress and cabaret performer who did a few TV-movies and guest appearances on TV shows but is probably better known as the younger sister of Oscar-winning actress Cloris Leachman

Johnny Maestro (March 24, 70) – Rock ‘n’ roll vocalist and musician who was the front man for the doo-wop group The Crests (Sixteen Candles) and later became the lead singer for the 1960s group The Brooklyn Bridge (Worst That Could Happen)

Eric Tunney (March 28, 45) – Canadian standup and actor-writer whose vehicles include the Kids in the Hall feature film Brain Candy

Sam Menning (March 29, 85) – Photographer and motion picture/television character actor whose movies include Life Stinks, Dutch, The Butcher’s Wife and Whatever It Takes

Roland MacLeod (April 3, 74) – British motion picture and television character actor whose films include The Last Remake of Beau Geste and A Fish Called Wanda; also had regular roles in such TV series as Coronation Street, Mr. Majeika and Berkeley Square

Lori Martin (April 4, 62) – Motion picture and television moppet thespian best known for her starring role as Velvet Brown in the TV series version of National Velvet; our exterminator (“Marv the Bug Man”) in Savannah was proud of the fact that he got Martin’s autograph when she appeared in the 1962 film Cape Fear (which was partly filmed in Savannah)

Henry Scarpelli (April 4, 79) – Comic book artist best known for his work on the comic strip version of Archie; father of actor Glenn Scarpelli, former moppet actor who was on TV’s One Day at a Time

James Aubrey (April 8, 62) – British motion picture and television moppet thespian best known as Ralph in the 1963 version of Lord of the Flies

Tom Ray (April 6, 90) – Motion picture and television animator who worked on many a Warner Brothers cartoon short but also worked for Chuck Jones at M-G-M and directed a pair of Tom & Jerry shorts (the 1960s version)

Sid Conrad (April 16, 86) – Motion picture and television character actor best known for his work on the daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless

Michael Adams (April 18, 60) – Motion picture and television stuntman who also acted in such productions as WarGames, Pale Rider and Commando

Myles Wilder (April 20, 77) – Motion picture and television scribe who penned scripts for such sitcoms as McHale’s Navy, Get Smart, The Doris Day Show and The Dukes of Hazzard; son of writer-director W. Lee (Killers from Space) and nephew of Oscar-winning writer-director Billy

Susan Reed (April 25, 84) – Actress/folksinger known for her expertise with the harp and zither and who starred in the 1948 feature film Glamour Girl

Alan Sillitoe (April 25, 82) – British author and playwright whose works include Saturday Night and Sunday Morning and The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

Furio Scarpelli (April 28, 90) – Italian motion picture and television writer who contributed to such films as Big Deal on Madonna Street, The Best of Enemies, Mafioso, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and The Postman

Kenji Shubaya (May 3, 88) – Former professional wrestler who later drifted into acting, appearing in such films as Hammett and in guest roles on TV series like Kung Fu and Mr. T and Tina

Jimmy Gardner (May 3, 85) – British motion picture and television character actor whose films include The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb, 10 Rillington Place, Frenzy and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Ernie Harwell (May 4, 92) – Legendary sportscaster and play-by-play man who enjoyed a long association with the Detroit Tigers over WJR (“It’s two for the price of one!”)

Robert J. Serling (May 6, 92) – Novelist and aviation writer (The President’s Plane is Missing) who’s probably more famous as the older brother of Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling

Babz Chula (May 7, 64) – American-born motion picture and television actress whose films include My American Cousin, Cousins, Double Jeopardy and The X-Files: I Want to Believe

Pamela Green (May 7, 81) – British actress and model whose film work includes Peeping Tom and The Day the Earth Caught Fire

Richard LaMotta (May 11, 67) – Inventor of the Chipwich (ice cream sandwich)

Phyllis Hodges Boyce (May 12, 73) – Motion picture and television actress whose films include Gone With the Wind (as the two-year-old Bonnie Blue Butler), Canon City and Girls Town; also appeared in the Star Trek episodes “The Galileo Seven” and “The Way to Eden”

Eddie Garrett (May 13, 82) – Motion picture and television character actor best known as coroner’s office photographer Ed on the TV series Quincy, M.E.

William “Wee Willie” Webber (May 23, 80) – Radio and television personality who’s best known as a kiddy show host for several Philly TV stations

Simon Monjack (May 23, 40) – British motion picture director-writer-producer whose credits include Two Days, Nine Lives and Factory Girl but he’s probably better known as the widower of actress Brittany Murphy, who died tragically six months earlier

Barbara New (May 24, 76) – British motion picture and television character actress best known for her Britcom roles as Mabel Wheeler on You Rang, M’Lord? and Vera Plumtree on Oh, Doctor Beeching!

Eugenia Paul (May 24, 75) – Motion picture and television actress best known for her role as Elena Torres on the Disney TV series Zorro

Katherine Reback (May 24, 59) – Motion picture and television writer best known for penning the screenplay to the 1995 film Fools Rush In

Pat Stevens (May 26, 64) – Television actress and voice artist who’s perhaps best known as the second Velma Dinkley on the Scooby-Doo cartoon series; she also had a recurring role as Nurse Baker on the sitcom M*A*S*H

Eddie Barth (May 28, 78) – Motion picture and television character actor best known as gumshoe Myron Fowler on the TV series Simon & Simon; as a voiceover announcer he was known as “Mr. Gravel” and was famous as the Miller Lite spokesman (“Everything you want from a beer and less…”)

Joan Rhodes (May 30, 89) – British actress-strongwoman whose films include The Pink Panther Strikes Again and The Elephant Man

Steven Reuther (June 5, 58) – Motion picture producer whose cinematic contributions include Dirty Dancing, Pretty Woman, Guilty by Suspicion, Face/Off and The Replacements

Christine Johnson (June 9, 98) – Contralto opera singer and actress who sang with the Metropolitan Opera and also appeared on NBC and CBS (notably on that network’s The Squibb Show in 1944); created the role of Nettie Fowler in the Broadway musical Carousel

David Ellison (June 10, 70) – British motion picture and television character actor best known as Sergeant Joseph Beck on the TV series Juliet Bravo

Al Williamson (June 12, 79) – Comic strip and comic book artist best known for his work on such creations as Flash Gordon and Secret Agent X-9

Phil Gordon (June 15, 94) – Motion picture and television character actor seen on many of Paul Henning’s sitcom creations including The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction and Green Acres (on which he served as a dialogue coach)

Vince O’Brien (June 19, 91) – Motion picture and television character actor whose films include The Hoodlum Priest, Annie Hall and Quiz Show but is best known as TV’s Shell Answer Man; his boob tube  roles include Dark Shadows, Ryan’s Hope and Law & Order

Irwin Barker (June 21, 58) – Canadian standup comedian and TV comedy writer who contributed to such shows as This Hour Has 22 Minutes and The Rick Mercer Report

Larry Jon Wilson (June 21, 69) – Country music musician-vocalist and Swainsboro, GA native who recorded a number of critically-acclaimed albums in the 1970s but never achieved any commercial success

Pennant Roberts (June 22, 69) – British television director-producer who helmed episodes of such TV series as Doctor Who, Blake’s 7 and Tenko

Tracy Wright (June 22, 50) – Canadian motion picture and television actress whose films include Highway 61, When Night is Falling, Superstar and Me and You and Everyone We Know

Alan Plater (June 25, 75) – British playwright and screenwriter whose scripted episodes of such TV series as Softly Softly, The Stars Look Down, Flambards and A Very British Coup; also created the Britcom Oh No, It’s Selwyn Froggitt (and its follow-up, Selwyn)

Gordon Mulholland (June 30, 89) – British motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include Treasure Island, The Cape Town Affair and the TV soap opera The Villagers

Noel Marshall (June 30, 79) – Motion picture producer (and former agent) whose films include The Harrad Experiment, The Exorcist and Roar—which he wrote, directed and co-starred along then-wife Tippi Hedren

Geoffrey Hutchings (July 1, 71) – British motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include Wish You Were Here, Henry V, White Hunter Black Heart and the TV series Brass, Maigret, Duck Patrol and Benidorm

David Blewitt (July 8, 81) – Motion picture and television editor whose films include Butterflies are Free, The Buddy Holly Story, The Competition and Ghostbusters

Walter Hawkins (July 11, 61) – Gospel music vocalist who, with his brother Edwin, founded The Edwin Hawkins Singers (Oh, Happy Day)

Alan Hume (July 13, 85) – British motion picture and television cinematographer who worked on many of the Carry On films as well as TV shows like The Avengers and Acapulco H.E.A.T.

Kip King (July 15, 72) – Actor-comedian who was one of the founders of the Groundlings comedy troupe; did a great deal of voice work on Hanna-Barbera cartoons and brought actor-comedian Chris Kattan into this world…so he’ll have a lot to answer for in the next

Shirley Silvey (July 17, 82) – Female animator and layout artist who worked for UPA at the start of her career before getting a job with Jay Ward and working on Rocky and His Friends and George of the Jungle

Doug Oldham (July 21, 79) – Southern gospel music vocalist and recording artist

Alvin Boretz (July 22, 91) – Television writer who wrote for such 1950s anthology series as Playhouse 90 and The Armstrong Circle Theatre before later contributing scripts to shows such as The Doctors and the Nurses, The Defenders and N.Y.P.D.

Al Goodman (July 26, 67) – R&B/soul vocalist who performed in the trio the Moments (Love on a Two-Way Street) before they group changed its name to Ray, Goodman and Brown

Peter R. Romero (July 29, 90) – Motion picture and television art director who worked on such productions as The Long Riders, The Right Stuff and TV’s The Waltons

Lorene Yarnell (July 29, 66) – Actress-performer who with partner (and husband, from 1972-86) Robert Shields formed a successful mime team that landed them a prime-time comedy-variety series on CBS-TV in 1977-78

Alex Johns (August 7, 43) – Motion picture and television producer whose projects including the animated sitcom Futurama and the 2006 film The Ant Bully

Tab Baker (August 9, 50) – Motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include Hoodlum, Save the Last Dance, The Ice Harvest and TV’s Prison Break

Abbey Lincoln (August 14, 80) – Jazz vocalist and actress whose film appearances include The Girl Can’t Help It, Nothing But a Man, For Love of Ivy and Mo’ Better Blues

James J. Kilpatrick (August 15, 89) – Conservative newspaper columnist and grammar scold best known for his appearances on TV’s Agronsky & Co. and as Shana Alexander’s debating partner in the “Point-Counterpoint” segments on 60 Minutes

Kenny Edwards (August 18, 64) – Pop music singer/songwriter who was one of the founding members of the Stone Poneys (Different Drum); later collaborated with the Poneys’ lead singer Linda Ronstadt and Karla Bonoff on various projects

Suzanne Grossmann (August 19, 72) – Motion picture and television actress/screenwriter who penned a goodly number of installments of the soap opera Ryan’s Hope

Nancy Dolman (August 21, 58) – Canadian comic actress and singer who appeared on several episodes of the sitcom Soap as Annie Selig Tate; was also married to SCTV’s Martin Short

Natalie Nevins (August 23, 85) – Female vocalist who appeared as a regular on TV’s The Lawrence Welk Show from 1965-69

James Deuter (August 29, 71) – Motion picture and television character actor best known for portraying Boswell on the TV series Early Edition

Victoria Longley (August 29, 49) – Australian motion picture and television actress best known for her roles on such TV shows as Mercury and Wildside

Ken Orsatti (August 31, 78) – One-time director of the Screen Actors Guild from 1981 t0 2000; his uncle was Vic Orsatti, who partnered with actor Rory Calhoun to form Rorvic Productions, producer of Calhoun’s TV western The Texan

Morgan White (September 2, 86) – Hawaiian TV personality and actor best known as kiddy show host “Pogo Poge” on Checkers & Pogo; also appeared in a few episodes of Hawaii Five-O

Bunny Summers (September 9, 86) – Motion picture and television character actress whose credits include Fuzz, The Last Starfighter, Re-Animator and Big Top Pee-wee

Billie Mae Richards (September 10, 88) – Canadian voice actress best known as the voice of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in several animated holiday specials; she also worked on such series as Smokey the Bear, King Kong and The Care Bears

Carlton “King” Coleman (September 11, 78) – R&B/soul music vocalist who sang lead on a 1959 single (Do the) Mashed Potatoes which was recorded by James Brown’s band (but contractually attributed to “Nat Kendrick and the Swans”)

Frank Jarvis (September 15, 69) – British motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include Rotten to the Core, The Italian Job, A Bridge Too Far and TV’s Warship and Catterick

Bill Littlejohn (September 17, 96) – Motion picture and television animator who enjoyed a long association on the Tom and Jerry shorts and Charlie Brown TV specials; also worked alongside Academy Award-winning producers John and Faith Hubley

James Bacon (September 18, 96) – Author and journalist who specialized in historical accounts of Hollywood; also acted in a number of movies and TV shows including all five Planet of the Apes movies and Capricorn One

John Crawford (September 21, 90) – Motion picture and television character actor best remembered as Sheriff Ep Bridges on the TV series The Waltons

Olga C. Nardone (September 24, 89) – Actress who appeared as one of the “Lullaby League” Munchkins in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz

Kenny Marino (September 27, 66) – Motion picture and television character actor who appeared in such films as Prince of the City and Death Wish 3

Clifford B. Hicks (September 29, 90) – Children’s book author and one-time special projects editor of Popular Mechanics; he created one of my childhood heroes, “magnificent brain” Alvin Fernald…whose misadventures were adapted for two The Wonderful World of Disney TV-movies featuring pretend girlfriend Kim Richards

Albertina Walker (October 8, 81) – Gospel music vocalist known for her long association with the gospel group The Caravans

Michael Galloway (October 12, 85) – Motion picture and television actor best known as Lt. Russ MacDonald on the 1960-62 TV series The Blue Angels

N. Paul Kenworthy (October 15, 85) – Motion picture cinematographer/director who worked on such Disney films as The Living Desert and The Vanishing Prairie

Margaret Gwenver (October 18, 84) – Motion picture and television character actress best known as Dr. Margaret Sedwick (also referred to as Sedgwick) on the TV soap Guiding Light (Sedwick was Gwenver’s maiden name; her daughter JoAnne was the show’s director)

Bob Guccione (October 20, 79) – Magazine publisher who founded the publications Penthouse, Omni, Viva and Longevity

Alex Anderson (October 22, 90) – Cartoonist and animator who was the original creator of Rocket J. Squirrel, Bullwinkle J. Moose, Dudley Do-Right and Crusader Rabbit

Robert Fitzpatrick (October 23, 73) – Actor, attorney and manager whose client list included the Beatles, the Who, the Rolling Stones, Peggy Lee, Don Johnson and Jay “Dennis the Menace” North

Joseph Stein (October 24, 98) – Playwright best known for writing the “books” for such musicals as Fiddler on the Roof and Zorba; he also wrote for many radio stars (Henry Morgan, Tallulah Bankhead) and TV’s Your Show of Shows

Glen “Frosty” Little (October 26, 84) – Professional circus clown who was one of only four performers to be dubbed “Master Clown” by Ringling Bros/Barnum & Bailey

Denise Borino-Quinn (October 27, 46) – Television actress best known as Ginny Sacramoni, the wife of mobster Johnny Sack (Vince Curatola) on TV’s The Sopranos

Robert Ellenstein (October 28, 87) – Motion picture and television character actor best remembered here at TDOY as one of the thugs terrorizing Cary Grant in North by Northwest; his other films include Rogue Cop, 3:10 to Yuma and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Gerard Kelly (October 28, 51) – Scottish motion picture and television character actor best known for his roles on the TV series Juliet Bravo and City Lights

George Hickenlooper (October 29, 47) – Motion picture director whose best known films are documentaries about other films—Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse (Apocalypse Now) and Picture This: The Times of Peter Bogdanovich in Archer City, Texas (The Last Picture Show, Texasville)

Mervyn Haisman (October 29, 82) – British motion picture and television scriptwriter who penned episodes for such series as Doctor Who, The Onedin Line and Howards’ Way

Douglas Argent (October 30, 89) – British television director-producer who worked on many a Britcom including Steptoe and Son, The Liver Birds and Fawlty Towers

Ina Clare (October 30, 77) – British actress-singer whose TV appearances include episodes of French and Saunders, In Sickness and In Health and EastEnders

Arthur Bernard Lewis (October 30, 84) – Television writer and producer who’s best known for his long stint as an executive story editor and supervising producer on TV’s Dallas

Monica Johnson (November 1, 64) – Novelist and motion picture/TV screenwriter who frequently collaborated with actor-director Albert Brooks on such films as Modern Romance, Lost in America, Mother and The Muse

Charlie O’ Donnell (November 1, 78) – Television/radio announcer whose early disc jockey work in Philadelphia eventually caught the attention of WFIL-TV’s Dick Clark, who made him his sidekick on American Bandstand; later became an announcer on such game shows as Wheel of Fortune, The Joker’s Wild, Tic-Tac-Dough and The $100,000 Pyramid

Michelle Nicastro (November 4, 50) – Motion picture and television actress/voice artist whose films include Body Rock, Bad Guys and When Harry Met Sally (as Billy Crystal’s college girlfriend)

Addison Powell (November 8, 89) – Motion picture and television character actor best known as Dr. Eric Lang on the TV soap opera Dark Shadows; his film roles include The Thomas Crown Affair, Three Days of the Condor and MacArthur

Dino De Laurentiis (November 11, 91) – Italian motion picture producer whose body of work includes Serpico, Death Wish, Ragtime and Blue Velvet…but here at TDOY he’s notorious for the 1976 remake of King Kong

Baby Marie Osborne (November 11, 99) – First major silent film moppet star whose resume includes Little Mary Sunshine, Maid of the Wild and Miss Gingersnap; later went to work for movie industry clothing supplier Western Costume

Willis Burks II (November 21, 75) – Motion picture and television actor whose vehicles include Sunday, King of California and Everything’s Jake

Ingrid Pitt (November 23, 73) – Polish-born motion picture and television actress whose films include Where Eagles Dare, The Vampire Lovers, Countess Dracula, The House That Dripped Blood and The Wicker Man

Irvin Kershner (November 27, 87) – Motion picture and television director whose films include A Fine Madness, The Flim-Flam Man, Loving, The Return of a Man Called Horse, Never Say Never Again and The Empire Strikes Back

Gene Polito (November 28, 92) – Motion picture and television cinematographer who worked on such series as Lost in Space, Mannix, It Takes a Thief and Alias Smith and Jones; his film work includes Prime Cut, Futureworld and Up in Smoke

Alfred Masini (November 29, 80) – Television producer whose boob tube creations include Entertainment Tonight, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, Solid Gold and Star Search

Mario Monicelli (November 29, 95) – Italian motion picture director whose oeuvre includes Big Deal on Madonna Street, Boccaccio ’70 and Casanova ‘70

Ted Sorel (November 30, 74) – Motion picture and television character actor whose vehicles include Lenny, Network, Without a Trace, From Beyond and TV’s Guiding Light

Hillard Elkins (December 1, 85) – Motion picture and theatrical producer whose film credits include Alice’s Restaurant, A New Leaf, A Doll’s House and Richard Pryor: Live in Concert

Chane’t Johnson (December 2, 34) – Motion picture and television actress whose credits include episodes of LAX and Life

Elaine Kaufman (December 3, 81) – Restaurateur whose self-titled establishment (Elaine’s) was a popular eatery and watering hole for celebrities and people like Pam (I just wanted to see if she’d read this far down)

Don Meredith (December 5, 72) – Former professional football quarterback turned sports commentator for ABC’s Monday Night Football; also dabbled in acting in made-for-TV films and sporadic appearances on Police Story

Captain Beefheart (aka Don Van Vlet) (December 17, 69) – Rock ‘n’ roll music legend who fronted The Magic Band

Marcia Lewis (December 21, 72) – Motion picture, theatrical and television actress who had regular gigs on such sitcoms as Who’s Watching the Kids and Goodtime Girls

Elizabeth Beresford (December 24, 84) – British children’s book author best known for creating The Wombles

Dorothy Jones (December 25, 76) – Pop music vocalist whose best known work was with the 1960s girl group the Cookies (Chains, Don’t Say Nothin’ Bad ‘Bout My Baby)

Teena Marie (aka Mary Christine Brockert) (December 26, 54) – R&B/soul/pop music singer-songwriter known as the Ivory Queen of Soul whose biggest hit was 1985’s Lovergirl

Bernard Wilson (December 26, 64) – R&B/soul music tenor who was a member of the 1970s group Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes (If You Don’t Know Me By Now)

Bill Erwin (December 29, 96) – Motion picture and television character actor immortalized as the irascible codger Sid Fields in the classic Seinfeld episode “The Old Man”

Nick Santo (December 30, 69) – Pop music vocalist who was a members of the 1960s doo-wop group the Capris (There’s a Moon Out Tonight)

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Toby O'B said...

Well, I gave you and Mr. Crider props for all the info I've gleaned for my own "Hat Squad" list and this is the perfect example why. When I get home in the morning, I'll have to update my 2010 compilation at Inner Toob to include all those that I missed.....

For this and all you do with TDOY, Ivan, thank you and all the best for 2011!

Scott said...

Fans of MST3K will remember Charles B. Pierce as the writer-director-star of Boggy Creek ll: And the Legend Continues (AKA The Barbaric Beast of Boggy Creek, Part ll). He was also responsible for another sequel, his untalented son Chuck Pierce, who costarred as the perpetually shirtless male ingenue, Tim.